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Civil Engineering

On April 26, 2010, The Civil Engineering Department celebrated the grand opening of the new 2,400-square-foot Richard ‘39 and Opal Vanderhoof Infrastructure Research and Education Facility. It is a state-of-the-art testing resource available for academia, industry and government agencies for research, design, and educational activities.

The heart of the Vanderhoof Facility is the William H. Schutte ‘33 Structural Laboratory. The laboratory has a strong floor and a three-story, L-shaped Frank E Gerace ‘48 Strong Wall to enable forces to be applied concurrently in three orthogonal directions. It also features a high-capacity hydraulic pump and servo-hydraulic actuators for applying controlled static or cyclic forces or displacements.

The laboratory may be used to determine the static strength, ductility, damping, and fatigue performance of structural components for alternative energy technologies, signage, pipeline systems, and other applications. Both seismic and wind loads can be simulated. Read more

At this year's university commencement, the number of civil engineering alumni at Case Western Reserve University increased by more than 25--one of the largest classes in recent history.

Twenty students received B.S. degree: Kevin Alland, Andrew Bittlemann, Megan Black, Jeffery Brown, Aaron Colorito, Katherine Fromwiller, Colin Haneman, Daniel Hill, Emily Kowalsky, Paul Manglona, Vincent Marvin, Christopher Notz, Alexander Papadopulos, Stephen Raffa, Michael Russo, Nikhil Sriram, Nissar Suhail, Nicholas Vergatos, Robert White, and Robert Wyman.

Seven students received M.S. degree: Randall Beck, Donald Cartwright, Jonathon Fagert, Ryan Franz, Chad Fusco, Ruth Sagertz, and Janette Siu. Two received Ph.D. degree: Chunmei He and Xinbao Yu.

CE senior student Katie Fromwiller has the experience of a lifetime. She flew on the NASA’s low-gravity plane nicknamed “vomit comet” while conducting experiments that will be used to design the device for oxygen extraction on lunar surface. Read more

Two graduating Case Western Reserve University students put their classroom knowledge to work and left a parting gift to the campus by erecting a 90-foot bridge built entirely of K’Nex. It was a stealthy operation that took weeks of planning and 10 hours of on-site assembly and lasted into the early morning hours. But when students and faculty arrived on campus May 4, they and others were greeted by the structure built by Christopher Toth of Columbus, Ohio, and Donald Cartwright of Alliance, Ohio.

“I designed the bridge in my head,” says Toth, who said past experience building a number of other large bridge models gave him the confidence that it would work.

Toth fabricated the unique single-cable suspension bridge in 2- to 3-food sections, using thousands of plastic K’Nex parts assembled in his dorm room. It took about 36 hours over six weeks he says.