EECS500 Spring 2014 Department Seminar

Mark Allman
An Empirical View of DNS Complexity & Security
White Bldg., Room 411
11:30am - 12:30pm
January 30, 2014

The Domain Name System (DNS) is a crucial piece of the Internet's fabric, charged with mapping human-friendly names into network addresses.  This talk highlights several recent projects that aim to explore and understand how the modern DNS ecosystem has organically
developed.  We will first tackle the complexity of the system and then illustrate how that complexity causes potential security vulnerabilities.  Finally, we will briefly sketch several possible mitigations to these security issues---which is the subject of ongoing work.


I am a computer scientist in the Networking and Security Group at the International Computer Science Institute (ICSI). I am also adjunct faculty in EECS at Case Western Reserve University. Prior to joining ICSI in 2003, I worked for BBN Technologies' Internetwork Research Department at NASA's Glenn Research Center for six years. And, prior to that I was part of Shawn Ostermann's Internetworking Research Group at Ohio University. My current research interests are in the areas of network architecture, network measurement, security, transport protocols and congestion control.