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Innovations in Imaging

In The News

Three Case Western Reserve University engineering undergraduate students were honored by the Ohio Cooperative Education Association (OCEA). Biomedical engineering major Emily Szabo won the association’s Cool Co-op Award for her co-op experience at Zimmer Biomet in Warsaw, Ind.

Defining which prostate cancers are potentially aggressive and provide early metastases is essential for patient management. It seems that visibility with MRI is a prognostic predictor.

Researchers and students working in the Center for Computational Imaging and Personalized Diagnostics have received several recent honors.

The goal is to start locally working with University Hospitals and Cleveland Clinic. Potentially game-changing cancer research, using artificial intelligence to determine who will benefit from chemotherapy before treatment begins, is being conducted at Case Western Reserve University .

Congratulations to researchers from the Center of Computational Imaging and Personalized Diagnostics (CCIPD) at Case Western Reserve University, Prateek Prasanna, PhD and Mohammadhadi Khorrami, for being selected to receive a 2019 Conquer Cancer Foundation of ASCO Merit Award on behalf of the Conquer Cancer Foundation and the 2019 Scientific Program.

Research by Andrew Shoffstall, A Mosquito Inspired Strategy to Implant Microprobes into the Brain,'received 2,127 article views in 2018, placing it as one of the top 100 read neuroscience papers for Scientific Reports in 2018.

For centuries scientists have sought an artificial substitute for blood. Equipped with modern nanotechnology and a humbler strategy, bioengineers think they’re closer than ever.

Research in artificial intelligence by Case Western Reserve scientists give hope to patients of lung and breast cancer; new discoveries help determine who will benefit from chemotherapy

Combination of Peri- and Intratumoral Radiomic Features on Baseline CT Scans Predicts Response to Chemotherapy in Lung Adenocarcinoma 

Biomedical researchers develop first open-source, quality-control review tool for fast-growing digital pathology field

A new approach combining CT and "radiomics," which extracts data from medical images, may be able to determine which patients with lung cancer are most likely to respond to chemotherapy.

Creative thinking can pay dividends for researchers taking on cancer.

Using data from computed tomography (CT) images, researchers may be able to predict which lung cancer patients will respond to chemotherapy, according to a new study published in the journal Radiology: Artificial Intelligence.

Research participant Keith Vonderhuevel demonstrated a prototype artificial hand, featuring a sense of touch, at a 2017 Capitol Hill event sponsored by Friends of VA Medical Care and Health Research.

A new radiomics study could help unlock one of the more challenging issues facing thoracic radiomics

Lin Li, PhD candidate, was awarded an honorable mention for the paper, "Radiomic Features derived from Pre-operative Multi-parametric MRI of Prostate Cancer are associated with Decipher Risk Score."

On Saturday, February 2, 2019, the student organization CWRU MedWish along with Alex Massiello (retired CCF biomedical engineer) transferred 4 PuseOx systems that a clinician from Nadowli Hospital will be taking back to northwest Ghana.

Could the spatial arrangement of immune cells help reveal when aggressive chemotherapy is the right course of action for early-stage lung cancer patients?

Scientists think they've identified a previously unknown form of neural communication that self-propagates across brain tissue, and can leap wirelessly from neurons in one section of brain tissue to another – even if they've been surgically severed.

The manuscript, "Spatial architecture and arrangement of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes for predicting likelihood of recurrence in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer" by Anant Madabhushi, PhD, F. Alex Nason Professor II of Biomedical Engineering, has been included in NCI’s Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program's (EGRP)’s Research Highlights for 2018.