Successes

"Team Cleveland" Cybathlon Entry

Advancements in implants are allowing individuals with paraplegia from spinal cord injuries to pedal recumbent trikes over ground with their otherwise paralyzed legs. This entry to the "Cybathlon" 2016 competition in Zurich, Switzerland utilizes an instrumented recumbent trike that senses crank angle and controls a surgically implanted neural stimulator to activate the appropriate muscles to propel the cycle forward.
Contact:

Jaswig

This adjustable-height stand-up desk, prototyped in think[box], is being used in homes, offices, and schools around the world. Stand-up desks have been shown in educational settings to improve focus and to cultivate a dynamic learning environment with improved teacher-student engagement. The company co-founders include Mathias Ellegiers, an alumnus of the CWRU MEM (Master of Engineering and Management) program.
Contact:
Tyler Schimmoeller, tyler@jaswig.com

Krishna Sculpture

The government of Cambodia returned a sculptural fragment after 3D scans showed it fit a sculpture at the Cleveland Museum of Art. This collaboration between the Cleveland Museum of Art and think[box] involved a multi-day 3D scan of the museum's Krishna sculpture, followed by painstaking work aligning a scan of the fragment with the scan of the sculpture to see if the section in Cambodia belonged to the museum's monumental sixth-century stone carving of Krishna.

Bone Quality Predictor

PhD Candidate Mustafa Unal in Dr. Akkus' Case Orthopaedic Bioengineering Laboratories won a Baxter Young Investigator award for his work on this Bone Hydration Detector, supported in part by the think[box] Student Project Fund.  Traditional Raman spectroscopy offers a non-destructive way to measure chemical composition of various biological minerals and compounds, however protein-related background fluorescence makes it difficult to detect water content in biological tissues. A novel improvement to Raman spectroscopy has made it possible to detect water content in bone - and to uniquely measure different bound water components and freely flowing water. This novel measurement of hydration status was then used to predict bone quality.
Contact:
Mustafa Unal , mxu30@case.edu

Lexus Heartbeat Car

Using electronics prototyped in think[box], this Lexus car uses Lumilor electroluminescent paint to turn the heartbeat of the driver into a light show.

Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

You can see this vertical axis wind turbine in action at the Case Western Reserve University Squire Valleevue Farm where it powers lighting and data acquisition systems that allow oyster mushrooms to be grown year-round. Cost, location, and performance were carefully considered in the design process to reduce dependence on grid-fed, non-renewable energy during operation. The Bingham Shop and staff aided in the machining and fabrication of the finished product.
Contact:
Kelly Hacker , kah134@case.edu
Matthew Patten , mtp31@case.edu

Eye Clinic Camera Phone Alignment Tool

This smartphone case is used in an eye clinic to help teach students and document eye conditions without the use of expensive photography equipment. Dr. Rony Sayegh and Dr. Charline Boente of the University Hospitals Department of Opthalmology worked with Ethan Tu of Case Western Reserve University on this case which connects a smartphone to the slit-lamp - a magnifier used in eye clinics to examine the eye - allowing medical students and staff to acquire high-definition photos of the eye using any phone. The smartphone was scanned using a high-precision 3D scanner, then a case for the smartphone was modeled in AutoCAD and 3D printed.
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Model Citizens

These sculptures were designed and built by an architect using 3D printed parts intermingled with wood pieces cut on the CNC table router. 
Contact:
Andrew Reach

Custom-Built CNC Table Router

This 3-axis CNC table router was designed and built from scratch by students from the University of Akron. Fabrication occurred at think[box] where parts were cut using the ShopBot.
Contact:
Tyler Schimmoeller, tds72@zips.uakron.edu

Compliant Modular Mesh Worm Robot

This project by the Biologically Inspired Robotics Laboratory at Case Western Reserve University seeks to develop a novel means of robotic locomotion useful in niche applications such as pipe inspection. Credit goes to Andrew D. Horchler, Akhil Kandhari, Kathryn A. Daltorio, Kenneth C. Moses, Kayla B. Andersen, Hillary Bunnelle, Joseph Kershaw, William H. Tavel, Richard J. Bachmann, Hillel J. Chiel, and Roger D. Quinn.

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