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EECS500 Fall 2016 Department Colloquium

Presenter: 
Eric D. Hixson PhD, MBA
Title: 
Analytics in the Health Care Enterprise
Affiliation: 
Cleveland Clinic
Location: 
White 411
Time: 
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Date: 
December 6, 2016

Healthcare is undergoing significant changes in regulatory requirements, payment structures, consumer expectations, and scientific discovery.  Healthcare organizations are increasingly challenged to task limited resources with organizing data from disparate systems to supply metrics for mission-critical objectives. “Big data” is rapidly becoming business-as-usual, and infrastructure options to address these demands are also changing at an exponential pace. 

 

Given the myriad of internal and external pressures, it is not surprising that many organizations struggle with data management and reporting. Typical enterprise stakeholders include information technology, finance, business units, and (in healthcare) clinical service lines.  Without a comprehensive strategy and strong governance these departments often drain limited resources by duplicating requests, effort, and capital expenditures.

 

The Cleveland Clinic has a long history of using data to advance the organization and improve the care we provide our patients; but it is at an inflection point.  In this discussion, we will discuss the Cleveland Clinic’s approach to analytics to date, summarize several cases studies, and describe the process and rationale in designing the next iteration of infrastructure to support the enterprise.

Biography: 

Eric Hixson PhD, MBA is the Senior Program Administrator in Business Intelligence at the Cleveland Clinic and has nearly 20 years’ experience developing and implementing operational and quality reporting, data warehousing, informatics, and operations.

Currently, Eric has been active in assessing analytics infrastructure, shaping predictive analytics strategy, and operationalizing metrics to support the enterprise.  His work in Medical Operations includes predictive modeling, forecasting, and data mining across multiple data domains.  He received his PhD from Case Western Reserve University in Epidemiology and Biostatistics and MBA from Cleveland State University in Healthcare Administration.